MLK and the Legacy of Black Civic Engagement

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“The Civil Rights Act… was not a product of charity of white America for a supine black America, nor was it the result of [their] enlightened leadership. This legislation was written in the streets.”

In March 1965, Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., made this comment about the groundbreaking Civil Rights Act of 1964, often described as the crowning achievement of the Civil Rights Movement. We must remember that Black activists organized an interracial “coalition of conscience” to create laws for a more equitable society. On Friday, January 17th the University Club of Phoenix hosted presenters who spoke on Black activism and how it connects us all as we approach Black History Month.

44288156_1577125248498726_rFirstly, the event was preceded with a dedication to the life and legacy of community activist, Tameka Spence, who tragically lost her life in a crash in downtown Phoenix on December 22nd, 2019. The ASU graduate worked for the Arizona Coalition for Change as a black census organizer and was beloved in the community. Rest in power, Tameka.

 

637039054807700000The first presenter, Rashaad Thomas, father, USAF veteran, poet and essayist, provided rousing poetic musings that honored the legacy of Martin Luther King Jr. His reflections and personal experience helped inspire those in attendance leaving a legacy and with his rhythmic cadence inspired reflection on their past, present and future.

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Next, Channel Powe, Balsz School Board President, shared stirring stories of local activism by highlighting the Black impact of civic change throughout Arizona’s history. Additionally, Powe encouraged a persuasive call to action to become a part of progressive leadership by joining local school boards, serving on city council panels and participating in the various Black community events around the Valley.

J.T RoaneThe final presenter, J.T. Roane, Assistant Professor in African and African American Studies at Arizona State, delivered an educational keynote address on environmental activism and urban renewal in the Black community. The focus of rehousing poor and Black displaced people was work continued long after King’s assassination. Organizations such as Mothers for Housing, a collective of homeless and marginally housed mothers and MOVE, the esoteric black liberation group that combined revolutionary ideology and work for animal rights, were cited as movements that were designed to take Dr. King’s vision forward. Roane also lead a Q&A after his presentation that received many engaging questions from the group.

“This event was truly eye opening,” shared Robert V., a A.T. Still University student. “I feel like I learned a lot about the Black contribution to Arizona history and activist groups such as MOVE, which I’d never heard of. The speakers make me feel like I want to get more involved in the community.”

This powerful event was well received by the nearly thirty culturally diverse attendees and allowed them to take home pieces of history and perspective to reflect on and share long past Black History Month.

“I thought the presentations were both educational and thought provoking,” stated Jaime B., an IT specialist in Phoenix. “The call to action makes me want to be more personally responsible about my attendance within my community. I want to be an advocate, not just for us, but for everyone.”

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Today, this legacy of Black civic engagement is strong in Phoenix. The demand for more events reminiscent of this is one will help foster more introspective gatherings to help shape the future and improve conditions in our Phoenix communities.

MLK and the Legacy of Black Civic Engagement Event – January 17th, 2020

mlk banner“The Civil Rights Act… was not a product of charity of white America for a supine black America, nor was it the result of [their] enlightened leadership. This legislation was written in the streets.”

In March 1965, Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., made this comment about the groundbreaking Civil Rights Act of 1964, often described as the crowning achievement of the Civil Rights Movement. We must remember that Black activists organized an interracial “coalition of conscience” to create laws for a more equitable society.

Today, this legacy of Black civic engagement is strong in Phoenix. Channel Powe, Balsz School Board President, will share stories of local activism. J.t. Roane, Assistant Professor in African and African American Studies at Arizona State, will deliver a keynote address on environmental activism in the Black community. Rashaad Thomas, father, USAF veteran, poet, and essayist, will provide poetic musings for to help us reflect on our past, present, and future.

Join us this Friday, January 17, 2020 from 5:30 pm- 7:30 pm at the University Club of Phoenix, 39 E Monte Vista Rd, Phoenix, Arizona 85004, for this thought provoking, free event. Everyone is welcome! Complimentary appetizers and a cash bar is available. Please R.S.V.P. at 602-254-5408 or office@uclubphx.com.

Spring Presentations

This week, I will be bringing a little desert heat to New England: on Thursday, I will be presenting “The Colored Metropolis: Race, Housing, and Metropolitan Development,” at Brown University’s Center for the Study of Race + Ethnicity in America. This talk will explore the shifting praxis of residential segregation in metropolitan Phoenix in the late 20th Century. Then, on Friday, I will be presenting my revised manuscript introduction, tentatively titled, “Annexation, Activism, and the Ascendance of Metropolitan Phoenix,” at Boston University’s Initiative on Cities Urban Inequality Workshop. Springtime is for sharing new research! Click on the links or for more information.

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Newberry Scholarly Seminars

I am delighted to be presenting a draft chapter from my unpublished manuscript, tentatively titled, Ashes and Dust: Settler Colonialism and the Ascendance of Metropolitan Phoenix, later this month in Chicago, IL. The presentation will begin at 3pm on Friday, November 30. at the Newberry Library. Much thanks to the Labor History and History of Capitalism Workshops, along with D. Bradford Hunt, for hosting me. Please email me if you’d like a pre-circulated copy of the paper.

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Planning Future Cities

I had the great fortune of attending Monmouth University to discuss the development of a new course reader, Planning Future Cities, I recently co-edited in conjunction with Walter Greason.  We had a discussion with faculty on textbook pedagogy over lunch before engaging business majors on the value of planning history in an Honors class. All in all, it was a wonderful experience, and I hope that I have an opportunity to continue to lecture laypeople on the role planning history can play in their professional lives. Many thanks to Walter for inviting me to join him in this project. There will be more publications coming soon!